5:06 PM 4/15/2016 – Mike Nova’s Shared NewsLinks Putins Main Target in Syria: Helping al-Assad Win the Civil War

Mike Nova’s Shared NewsLinks
Putins Main Target in Syria: Helping al-Assad Win the Civil War

mikenova shared this story from Eurasia Daily Monitor – The Jamestown Foundation.

On March 14, President Vladimir Putin surprised both friend and foe by announcing that the Russian military mission in Syria was mostly accomplished and ordering the withdrawal of most of our forces (Kremlin.ru, March 14; see EDM, March 17, 21). A month later, it became apparent Russias engagement in Syria still continues and that Putin has not abandoned his long-time ally, Syrian President Bashar al-Assad. The partial redeployment of attack jets back to Russia was a shrewd tactical move that Putin dressed up as potential change in strategy. By the end of March, according to the defense ministry, all tactical jets designated for withdrawal have been redeployed to Russia together with some combat helicopters and ground support. The remaining Russian forces continue to attack terrorists in Syria and support the pro-al-Assad forces (RIA Novosti, March 28).

A tentative and partial ceasefire brokered by Moscow and Washington went into force on February 27. Some of the Russian attack jet flew back together with several planeloads of support personnel, but all the heavy military equipment stayed in Syria, together with the bulk of the ground troops, special forces troops and antiaircraft missile batteries. While some attack aircraft were withdrawn, new assets were introduced: Russias most modern attack helicopter gunships, the Mi-28N Night Hunter and Ka-52 Alligator. During the first five months of the Russian air campaign in Syria, the older Mi-24 and Mi-35 (a modification of the Mi-24) helicopter gunships were deployed to guard the Hmeymim airbase. Last month, as the number of attack jets was reduced, the newest helicopters began flying attack sorties and were reportedly actively engaged in driving Islamic State (IS) forces out of the ancient desert city of Palmyra (RIA Novosti, March 28). After Putins announced withdrawal, Russian casualties continued. A special forces lieutenant was killed fighting the IS in Palmyra; and on April 12, an Mi-28N helicopter crashed in Homs province, killing both pilots (Interfax, April 12).

The official reason given for continued Russian military engagement in Syria after the declaration of cessation of hostilities is the need to fight jihadists from the Islamic State and the al-Qaeda-connected al-Nusra Front. The offensive by al-Assads forces on Palmyra, planned together with Russian military advisors and supported by Russian forces, was tacitly welcomed by the West as a move against the ISinstead of again being an attack on the moderate Syrian opposition. There was hope that after capturing the desert crossroads town of Palmyra, the Russian-supported offensive would continue east and northeast, deeper into IS-controlled territory (Interfax, March 30). This did not materialize: Palmyra is a prize on its ownits capture was a propaganda bonus both to Putin and al-Assad. On top of that, there are oil fields in the towns vicinity. When Palmyra fell to the IS last May, with it were lost the last commercially important oil fields the al-Assad regime controlled; and now the Syrian government has taken them back.

Neither Putin nor al-Assad appear willing to begin an all-out offensive to destroy the Islamic State while opposition forces in the rear are left undefeated. Last week, speaking to the press in St. Petersburg, Putin insisted: Our main task in Syria was to reinforce the Syrian state and its legitimate government [al-Assad]. This task has been achieved, but the situation is still far from a decisive turnaround (Interfax, April 7).

This week, in Damascus, Syrian Prime Minister Wael Nader al-Halqi told a visiting delegation of Russian parliamentarians: We, with our Russian partners, are preparing an operation to liberate Aleppo and block all illegitimate armed rebel groups that are not part of or have violated the ceasefire agreement (TASS, April 10). Al-Halqis statement seems to indicate possible preparations to begin a major offensive in and around Aleppo against the Syrian opposition, using as a pretext alleged ceasefire violations and the presence of al-Nusra fighters whounlike the Islamic Stateare often intermixed with other more moderate opposition groups.

On April 11, at a briefing in Moscow, the chief of the Main Operational Directorate of the General Staff, Lieutenant-General Sergei Rudskoy, accused the al-Nusra Front of concentrating up to 10,000 fighters and heavy weapons close to Aleppo and of attacking government (al-Assad) forces in an attempt to cut the DamascusAleppo road and isolate the north of Syria. According to Rudskoy, Russian jets and al-Assads forces are in action in and around Aleppo to stop al-Nusra, but no one is planning to storm the city. Moscow is keen to push Washington into accepting the value of bilateral deals to resolve the Syria conflict and possibly to use the same big power concert understanding in other places, like Ukraine, to decide the plight of lesser nations. Rudskoy insisted the Russo-US ceasefire agreement in Syria is important and called on Washington to do its part in reining in the Syrian opposition (Syria.mil.ru, April 11).

During the five-year-long Syrian civil war, Aleppo, as many other towns, has been divided by deeply entrenched positions, where fighters and civilians hide from artillery and bombs. But during the second Chechen war in the early 2000s, the Russian military developed reliable tactics to break prolonged standoffs and sieges with heavy aerial and artillery bombardments, including by the use of incendiary and thermobaric warheads, also known as vacuum or fuel bombs. The thermobaric weapon of choice of the Russian military is the TOS-1A Solntsepyok (Sunburn) Heavy Flamethrower System. The TOS-1A was deployed in Syria by last September; it was used to effectively dislodge rebels from mountain hideouts in northern Latakia province and recently in the storming of Palmyra (Ridus.ru, March 29).

The ТОС-1А launches heavy but relatively short-range (up to 3.5 kilometers) missiles that deliver thermobaric warheads, which scorch anyone hiding in dugouts, tunnels and bunkers. The ТОС-1А has been filmed in action in Latakia and Palmyra. In Syria it may be manned by Russian contractors or advisers. The use of the ТОС-1А against populated settlements could violate international law, but its use in Chechnya and now in Syria does not seem to cause much international alarm. The ТОС-1А could be a game-changer in the Syrian civil war, and the temptation to forcibly end the Aleppo quagmire could push al-Assad and his allies into decisive action. Liberating Aleppo is a high priority goal as its fall would demoralize the Syrian opposition, possibly finally putting al-Assads overall victory within reach.

Intelligence, Espionage, Counterespionage, And Operations, chapter 01

mikenova shared this story from Intelligence Analysis and Reporting.

Title:                      Comprehensive Bibliographies

Author:                Paul W. Blackstock

Blackstock, Paul W. (1978) and Frank L. Schaf, Jr.Chapter 1: Comprehensive Bibliographies, Intelligence, Espionage,Counterespionage, And Covert Operations: A Guide to Information Sources.Detroit: Gale Research Co.

LCCN:    74011567

Z6724.I7 B55

Subjects

Date Updated:  April 14, 2016

Chapter 1. Comprehensive Bibliographies

Gunzenhauser, Max (1968). Geschichte Der Geheimen Nachrichtendienst: (Spionage, Sabotage Und Abwehr}: Literatur Berlchte Und Bibliographie. Frankfurt: Bernard und Graefe

The second comprehensive bibliography of secret intelligence. An 80-page introductory essay precedes some 400 pages of bibliography. Although a smaller effort than Harris (1968), it includes many items, particularly German ones, missed by the earlier work, Moreover, the two bibliographies complement one another as the Gunzenhauser bibliography is organized chronologically and geographically while the Harris one is organized under 27 topics.[1]

The 4,000 entries cover tites in English and several European languages, without annotation, although the most important works are discussed in the introductory critique of the literature, The discussion of strategic intelligence is relatively weak; nevertheless, this work is an indispensable guide for the scholar and researcher, and has been used extensively in compiling the present bibliography.

Harris, William R. (1968). Intelligence And National Security: A Bibliography With Selected Annotations. rev. ed. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Univ., Center for International Affairs

[1] Whaley, Barton (1973). Codeword BARBAROSSA. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, pp. 329-330

Intelligence, Espionage, Counterespionage, And Operations, chapter 02

mikenova shared this story from Intelligence Analysis and Reporting.

Title:                      Selective Bibliographies

Author:                  Paul W. Blackstock

Blackstock, Paul W. (1978) and Frank L. Schaf, Jr.Chapter 2: Selective Bibliographies, Intelligence, Espionage, Counterespionage, And Covert Operations: A Guide to Information Sources. Detroit: Gale Research Co.

LCCN:    74011567

Z6724.I7 B55

Subjects

Date Updated:  April 14, 2016

Chapter 2. SELECTIVE BIBLIOGRAPHIES

As a result of the interest in intelligence stimulated by World War II, three bibliographies on intelligence and espionage were prepared by U.S. agencies. A fourth bibliography was authored by Joseph S. Galland. All suffer from being out of date. Additionally, the majority of the items in the three government bibliographies are mainly personal memoirs by individual espionage or counterespionage agents, and illustrate the limitations for serious study of all such works.

Galland, Joseph Stanislaus (1945, 1970). An Historical And Analytical Bibliography of The Literature of Cryptology. New York: AMS Press

Haven, Violet S. (1942), comp. Espionage: Bibliography1942. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice Library

This list consists of sixteen typewritten pages containing about 250 entries, with emphasis on counterespionage.

U.S. Department of State (1948). Intelligence, a Bibliography of its Functions, Methods and Techniques, Part I, Bibliography No. 33. Washington, DC: December 20, 1948. Mimeographed, unbound.

U.S. Department of State (1948). Intelligence, a Bibliography of Its Functions, Methods, and Techniques, Part II: Periodical and Newspaper Articles, Bibliography No. 331. Washington, DC: April 11, 1949. Mimeographed, unbound.

The two-part State Department bibliography of more than 700 items was compiled from an unpublished bibliography developed by the Office of Strategic Services (OSS), and from entries in the Library of Congress card index,

Further arrests in Edward Lin spy case possible, says US official

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An American official has told Newsweek magazine that the possibility of further arrests in the espionage case of United States Navy flight officer Edward Lin should not be ruled out.

Every Dollar Counts: New Army Policy Aims To Shake Up Spending Practices

mikenova shared this story from Defense News – Home.

The Army is rolling out a new policy Friday projected to shake up how the service spends its money.

     
No links to foreign terrorists found on San Bernardino iPhone so far, officials say – Ames Tribune

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CNN
No links to foreign terrorists found on San Bernardino iPhone so far, officials say
Ames Tribune
… that happened in the United States, we believed we had to use all lawful tools to find out whether there was evidence on that phone that either shed more light on what these two killers had done, FBI Director James B. Comeysaid at Ohio’s Kenyon
Banks Want In On Check-Cashing BusinessPYMNTS.com
FBI Paid Hackers To Help Unlock San Bernardino Shooter’s iPhoneDark Reading
FBI’s Zero-Day iPhone Hack: Many QuestionsBankInfoSecurity.com (blog)
Georgia TodaySocial Barrel (blog)
all 123 121 news articles »
IRAN: Better To Be Feared Than Loved

mikenova shared this story from StrategyPage.com.

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Panama Papers: China detains lawyer after he shares details of leaders online – The Guardian

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The Guardian
Panama Papers: China detains lawyer after he shares details of leaders online
The Guardian
Ge Yongxi, an outspoken attorney known for defending underground church leaders and political and social activists, was taken from his home in Foshan, a city in southern China, at about midnight on Thursday by five plain-clothes policemen, according to
China Issues, Deletes Article Defending President Over Panama PapersRadio Free Asia

all 26 news articles »

Afghan military says it hit Islamic State in eastern province

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The Afghan military says its air force has hit Islamic State militants in the eastern province of Nangarhar, killing at least 40 insurgents.

UK military officers give targeting training to Saudi military – The Guardian

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The Guardian
UK military officers give targeting training to Saudi military
The Guardian
The extent of the assistance to Saudi units from the Ministry of Defence has emerged from freedom of information (FoI) requests made by the human rights organisation Reprieve, which is urging the British government to reconsider providing military support.

and more »

Did Pakistan secretly fund an attack on CIA officers in 2009? Memo makes controversial claim

mikenova shared this story from In Homeland Security.

The document, marked “secret” and still heavily redacted, makes a startling claim: The Pakistan government helped fund a suicide bombing in Afghanistan.

U.S. government ranks worst among major industries on cybersecurity: Report

mikenova shared this story fromwww.washingtontimes.com stories: Security.

U.S. federal, state and local government agencies have the worst cybersecurity protocols compared to 17 major private industries, including transportation, retail and health care, according to a new report released Thursday.

The report, from venture-backed security risk monitoring startup SecurityScorecard, measured the security of government and private industries across 10 …

Terrorist’s iPhone didn’t turn up any useful information, FBI admits – Telegraph.co.uk

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Telegraph.co.uk
Terrorist’s iPhone didn’t turn up any useful information, FBI admits
Telegraph.co.uk
US law enforcement agents have admitted that they are yet to find valuable information in the San Bernardino gunman’s iPhone 5c that became the focus of a major legal battle between Apple and the FBI. The FBI said it is yet to find anything
The FBI still hasn’t found any useful info on San Bernardino terrorist’s iPhoneBGR
Why Apple and the FBI Are Still at Odds Over EncryptionNewsweek
FBI requests warrant to unlock iPhone 5c connected to California murder investigationApple Insider
Popular ScienceCNETQuartz
all 118 113 news articles »
Information Technology in A Democracy

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Title:                      Information Technology in A Democracy

Author:                Alan F. Westin

Westin, Alan F. (1971), ed. Information Technology in A Democracy. Cambridge, Mass., Harvard University Press

LCCN:    72143233

JK468.A8 W45

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Series

Date Posted:      April 15, 2016

Reviewed by Paul W. Blackstock and Frank L. Schaf[1]

The editor describes this work as an edited collection of original and secondary materials about government use of information technology … [which] includes descriptions of information technology systems by the agency spokesman and consultants who have created them, providing readers with the operating assumptions, systems objectives, and stages of development as the managers of these systems see these happenings.

[1] Blackstock, Paul W. (1978) and Frank L. Schaf, Jr. Intelligence, Espionage, Counterespionage, And Covert Operations: A Guide to Information Sources. Detroit: Gale Research Co., p. 88-89.

Intelligence, Espionage, Counterespionage, And Covert Operations: A Guide to Information Sources, chapter 3

mikenova shared this story from Intelligence Analysis and Reporting.

Title:                      Encyclopedia Articles

Author:                 Paul W. Blackstock

Blackstock, Paul W. (1978) and Frank L. Schaf, Jr.Chapter 3: Encyclopedia Articles, Intelligence, Espionage, Counterespionage, AndCovert Operations: A Guide to Information Sources. Detroit: Gale Research Co.

LCCN:    74011567

Z6724.I7 B55

Subjects

Date Updated:  April 15, 2016

The concept of covert operations is so new that there are no encyclopedia articles on the subject in spite of the fact that the United States and Great Britain developed special agencies (the American Office of Strategic Services and the British Special Operations Executive) to COIT} out such operations during World War II.

The first encyclopedia article on espionage appears in Diderots classic Encyclopedie (Paris, 1751, V, 971) under the rubric espion. The spy is defined as a person paid to examine the actions, movements, etc. of another, and especially to discover the state of military affairs. This brief article also contains the famous observation that an ambassador is sometimes a distinguished spy who is protected by the law of nations.

Most encyclopedia articles on either espionage or intelligence reflect the fact that intelligence agencies regard any disclosure of sources or methods as a breach of security. Hence the articles tend to be historical summaries rather than substantive or analytical treatments of either espionage or intelligence. With a few recent exceptions most articles also omit consideration of modern scientific and technological advances such as technical sensors, which have produced important new means of collecting information. Representative articles are annotated be low.

Bolshaia Sovetskaia Entsiklopedlla. 2nd ed. Moscow; 1955. Vol.35, pp. 591-92.[1]

Although the USSR has one of the most formidable combined espionage-intelligence-security police organizations of modern times[2], this edition of the Great Soviet Encyclopedia had only one article under the heading intelligence (разведка, razvedka) which dealt exclusively with military reconnaissance. There was nothing under the rubrics espionage or security services.

Encyclopedia Americana

Blackstock, Paul W. Espionage. International ed. New York, Americana Corp., 1973. Vol. 10, pp. 584-87.

The article discusses and evaluates espionage as one of the means by which intelligence agencies collect information through their clandestine services, and notes the relative decline of its importance as new technological means of surveillance have been developed (technical sensors). Summarizes principles and techniques of recruitment, cover, communications, agent handling, and organization of clandestine services.

Hoover, John Edgar. Espionage and Counterespionage. New York: Americana Corp., 1965. Vol. 10, pp. 504-6.

The article by the former director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation begins with a definition of terms, followed by a historical summary of famous espionage cases from ancient times through the post-World War II period. There is a section on the espionage agent and his training, another on techniques, and a final section .on security end democracy, which reflects the familiar cold war orientation of the author of Masters of Deceit.[3]

Ransom, Herry Howe. Intelligence, Strategic. lnternational ed. New York: Americana Corp., 1973, Vol. 15, pp. 246-48.

This substantive article by the author of The Intelligence Establishment[4] stresses basic definitions and concepts, the intelligence process (collection, evaluation, and dissemination to decision makers), and describes briefly the intelligence organizations of the United States, Great Britain, and the Soviet Union.

ENCYCLOPEDIA BRITANNICA

Don, W.J. [pseud.]. Espionage. Chicago: Encyclopoedia Britannica, 1954. Vol. 12, pp. 459-62.

The author is presumably William Joseph Donovan, head of the U.S. Office of Strategic Services during World War II. The article is a general survey which discusses the necessity, scope, types of intelligence, and organization, stressing the argument: It is only when intelligence collection, analysis, evaluation, synthesis and dissemination are in one pierce and under one direction that the optimum value can be obtained.

Ransom, Harry Howe. Intelligence end Counterintelligence. 15th ed. Chicago: Encyclopaedia Britannica, 1974. Vol. 9, pp. 679-86.

The author of this excellent, substantive article also wrote the article on the some subject for the ENCY-CLOPEDIA AMERICANA. It discusses definitions, concepts, the intelligence process itself, and describes briefly the intelligence organizations of the great world powers. Brief bibliography included.

Stessin, Lawrence. Intelligence, Military, Political and Industrial. Chicago: Encyclopaedia Brltannlca, 1972. Vol. .12, pp. 347-50.

The article is for the most port a general historical survey with brief descriptions of the modern intelligence organizations of the United States, the USSR, Great Britain, and France, followed by a section on industrial espionage.

ENCYCLOPEDIA OF THE SOCIAL SCIENCES

Rowan, Richard Wilmer. Espionage. New York: Macmillan, 1931. Vol. 5, pp. 594-96.

This three-page article by a prolific writer and historian in the espionage field is devoted almost entirely to a history of espionage since ancient times, with an added paragraph on industrial espionage and a generalized discussion of countermeasures.

INTERNATIONAL ENCYCLOPEDIA OF THE SOCIAL SCIENCES

Ransom, Harry Howe . Intelligence, Political and Military. New York: Macmillan and the Free Press, 1968. pp. 415-21.

The article is a general survey which stresses definitions, reviews the basic literature, and gives suggestions for further social science research.

Seth, Ronald. Encyclopedia of Espionage. Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, 1974. 718 p. Index. British ed. London: New English Library, 1975. 683 p. Bibliography.

A remarkable compilation of information on espionage by a very prolific author on intelligence subject matter and a World War II British agent. Easy to use, the encyclopedia arranges entries by names of spies (the first entry is ex-Soviet agent Colonel Rudolph Abel), intelligence organizations, espionage networks, and well-known espionage incidents. Each entry is followed by bibliographic references for additional reading or research, The author notes that where no such bibliography is provided, in most cases the information has come only from my notebooks.

Although this work is billed on the cover of the English edition as the Spys Whos Who, its coverage is almost entirely historical. It is useful as a biographical reference and also because it describes various networks and operations such as the Red Orchestra or Gieske s EnglandspieI. However, there are many curious gaps in the biographical coverage. For example, there are almost three pages on Sir Paul Dukes who directed British espionage in the USSR during the revolutionary period, but nothing at all on Sir Bruce Lockhart, Sidney Reilly, Boris Savinkov, Captain George Hill, and other British agents active during the same period. Moreover, the lack of an index makes the work more suitable for bedside reading than for reference purposes.

[1] The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (GSE) (Russian: Большая советская энциклопедия, or БСЭ Bolshaya sovetskaya entsiklopediya) is one of the largest Russian-language encyclopedias published by the USSR from 1926 to 1990, and again since 2002 (under the name Bolshaya Rossiyskaya entsiklopediya or Great Russian Encyclopedia).

[2] Of course, since the collapse of the Soviet Union, the FSB (successor to the KGB) is no less skilled that was the KGB.

[3] Hoover, J. Edgar (1958). Masters of Deceit: The Story Of Communism In America And How to Fight It. New York: Henry Holt & Co.

[4] Ransom, Harry Howe (1970). The Intelligence Establishment. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Univ. Press

Intelligence, Espionage, Counterespionage, And Covert Operations, Part I

mikenova shared this story from Intelligence Analysis and Reporting.

Title:                      Intelligence, Espionage, Counterespionage, And Covert Operations, Part I

Author:                  Paul W. Blackstock

Blackstock, Paul W. (1978) and Frank L. Schaf, Jr. Intelligence,Espionage, Counterespionage, And Covert Operations: A Guide to Information Sources. Detroit: Gale Research Co.,

LCCN:    74011567

Z6724.I7 B55

Subjects

Date Updated:  April 15, 2016

Part I GENERAL BIBLIOGRAPHIC RESOURCES

Due to the confusion of terms, books and articles on intelligence, espionage, and covert operations are listed under a wide variety of headings in the subject index of the U.S. Library of Congress and in the corresponding catalogs of other libraries. However, there are two comprehensive bibliographies which may be consulted to identify books on these subjects. Each of these bibliographies has an extended critique of the literature. In addition there are certain specialized bibliographies which are useful to the person interested in researching a specific aspect of intelligence, espionage, or covert operations. These comprehensive and specialized bibliographies are cited in the following pages.

Chapter 1. Comprehensive Bibliographies

Chapter 2. Selective Bibliographies

As a result of the interest in intelligence stimulated by World War II, three bibliographies on intelligence and espionage were prepared by U.S. agencies. A fourth bibliography was authored by Joseph S. Galland. All suffer from being out of date. Additionally, the majority of the items in the three government bibliographies are mainly personal memoirs by individual espionage or counterespionage agents, and illustrate the limitations for serious study of all such works.

Chapter 3 Encyclopedia Articles

The concept of covert operations is so new that there are no encyclopedia articles on the subject in spite of the fact that the United States and Great Britain developed special agencies (the American Office of Strategic Services and the British Special Operations Executive) to COIT} out such operations during World War II.

The first encyclopedia article on espionage appears in Diderots classic Encyclopedie (Paris, 1751, V, 971) under the rubric espion. The spy is defined as a person paid to examine the actions, movements, etc. of another, and especially to discover the state of military affairs. This brief article also contains the famous observation that an ambassador is sometimes a distinguished spy who is protected by the law of nations.

Most encyclopedia articles on either espionage or intelligence reflect the fact that intelligence agencies regard any disclosure of sources or methods as a breach of security. Hence the articles tend to be historical summaries rather than substantive or analytical treatments of either espionage or intelligence. With a few recent exceptions most articles also omit consideration of modern scientific and technological advances such as technical sensors, which have produced important new means of collecting information. Representative articles are annotated be low.

Has Argentina entered the ‘War on Drugs’? – Insightcrime.org

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Insightcrime.org
Has Argentina entered the ‘War on Drugs’?
Insightcrime.org
There they met with officials from the US Department of State, the DEA andFBI, among others, for technical advice on interventions and weapons. (As InSight Crime reported at the time, Argentine and US … All this hardware has been used in the context

Pentagon to Congress: We Need Base Closures

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WASHINGTON Pentagon officials say the Defense Department is wasting money on excess facilities and needs Congress to step in and close them, but they face an uphill fight.

     
Zika Virus Map Shows a United States Outbreak is Up Next

mikenova shared this story from In Homeland Security.

A recently issued Zika virus map shows how the virus is spreading in both hemispheres. Experts believe an outbreak in the U.S. this summer is inevitable.

Judge seals most files in court case over CIA sex case leaks

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A U.S. judge has ordered the most sensational court records to remain sealed in the now-abandoned lawsuit over leaks in the investigation that led to the resignation of former CIA director David Petraeus. The files include transcripts of sworn interviews with senior Obama administration officials about the sex scandal and its fallout.

2:08 PM 4/15/2016 Headlines: John Kerry says Russia fighter jet encounters with USS Donald Cook could have been a shoot-down CBS News | Five Rapid Results from Putins Call-in Marathon | News | The Moscow Times

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Во время встречи с президентом  председателем правления Банка ВТБ Андреем Костиным.

 

Russian Forces Remain Heavily Involved in Syria, Despite Appearances The New York Times

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Russian attack helicopters replaced jets as Russia operates a secretive war in its effort to influence the political outcome in Syria.

Source: Russian Forces Remain Heavily Involved in Syria, Despite Appearances – The New York Times

Candidates Make Their Case at U.N.

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Candidates for secretary general of the United Nations pitched themselves before the General Assembly this week.

A Man Of Modest Means? Putin Says He Made Just $133,000 In 2015

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Kremlin opponents and Western officials have long accused Russian President Vladimir Putin of using his power to accrue massive wealth and lavish real estate, including a sprawling Black Sea estate widely referred to as “Putin’s Palace.”

Russian Forces Remain Heavily Involved in Syria, Despite Appearances

mikenova shared this story from Russia.

Russian attack helicopters replaced jets as Russia operates a secretive war in its effort to influence the political outcome in Syria.

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